Back to Top

Feline Wellness Plan

JUMP TO:

These guidelines are based on the recommendations and protocols set by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA).

Kittens: Best Care Standards

In your kittens first year they will be seen several times by our veterinarians. The reason for this is that several of the necessary vaccinations need to be given several times (ie. boostered) in order for your kitten to build immunity to many of the common viruses that potential can harm their health.

Your Kittens Physical Exam

During these initial visits we will cover general kitten care such as nutrition, monthly parasite preventative care, nail care etc.

Fecal Screening:

All kitten should have a baseline fecal parasite screening test. Simply bring a small stool sample to your first appointment and we will send that to our lab for parasite screening.

Infectious Disease Testing (FeLV/FIV):

All kittens after the age of 4 months should have a baseline screening test for the most common feline infectious diseases, which are Feline Leukemia Virus and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus. This testing is a routine and essential screening test for all kittens.

Vaccination Evaluation

Depending on whether your new kitten is going to be an Indoor Only cat or a Indoor/Outdoor cat we will help decide which vaccinations are right for your new kitten.

Core Required Vaccines:

Feline Distemper Virus (FDV):
All kittens, no matter whether they are indoor only or going to be indoor/outdoor cats should be vaccinated with the FDV vaccine. This vaccinate covers the common disease of Feline Distemper, Panleukopenia and Calci.

Rabies:
According to CT state law all cats, whether indoor or indoor/outdoor are required to be rabies vaccinated. All rabies vaccines in the first year of a kittens life are considered 1 year vaccines. All rabies vaccines after this initial vaccination will be considered 3 yr. vaccines.

Optional Vaccinations:

Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV): If you are planning on letting your kitten grown into a indoor/outdoor cat then vaccinating for FeLV is a must. This common disease is very easily transmitted from cat to cat through their saliva and hissing.

 
 

All Cats Under 9 years of age: Best Care Standards (Indoor Only)

Annual Physical Examination:

Even though your cat is indoor only and may or may not require a vaccination on an annual basis it is critical to have their health evaluated by a veterinary professional. Cats are the most elusive animals when it comes to hiding sickness or health problems and because of that having a through physical exam every year is critical to keeping up their overall health. During your cats routine health exam we will evaluate everything from eye health, to dental health, to cardiac health, to weight management.

Annual Vaccinations based on needs or exposure:

The Feline Distemper Vaccine is recommended to be given once every 3 years after your cats first year vaccine. Rabies by state law is also required every 3 years.

General Health Recommendations:

Depending on exposure ie. whether of not you have other animals in your household we recommend monthly flea & tick preventions.

All Cats Under 9 years of age: Best Care Standards (Indoor/Outdoor)

Annual Physical Examination:

Cats who are both indoor/outdoor have a greater risk to diseases and parasite exposure. Cats are the most elusive animals when it comes to hiding sickness or health problems and because of that having a through physical exam every year is critical to keeping up their overall health. During your cats routine health exam we will evaluate everything from eye health, to dental health, to cardiac health, to weight management.

Annual Vaccinations:

It is recommended by the AVMA and Feline Practitioners that all cats who go outside should have the Feline Leukemia Vaccine (FeLV) on an annual basis.

The Feline Distemper Vaccine is recommended to be given once every 3 years after your cats first year vaccine. Rabies by state law is also required every 3 years.

Annual GI Parasite Test (Fecal Testing):

Whether your cat is a passive outdoor explorer or a hunter, having a routine fecal parasite screening is a must. All animals who go outside have an increased exposure to common GI parasites and therefore should be screened for these on an annual basis

General Health Recommendations:

Flea and Tick Prevention:

Currently is only one option for both flea and tick prevention for your cat. That product is Frontline Plus(R) and is safe and effective and should be used if your cat goes outside. The key to making this preventative most effective is by applying this topical medications properly. At MAH we recommend that you shave a small patch of hair down to the skin so that when the liquid is applied, all of it is absorbed by the skin and not taken up by the surrounding hair.

GI Parasite Preventions:

If you use Advantage Multi(R) with your cat, which covers fleas but not ticks, this topical medication also protects your cat against the most common GI parasites.

If you use Frontline Plus(R) which protects against fleas and ticks then your would also want to use a GI parasite preventative. Our staff can help you choose the best options for your cat.

 

All Cats Over 9 years of age: Best Care Standards (Indoor Only)

Annual Physical Examination:

Even though your cat is indoor only and may or may not require a vaccination on an annual basis it is critical to have their health evaluated by a veterinary professional. Cats are the most elusive animals when it comes to hiding sickness or health problems and because of that having a through physical exam every year is critical to keeping up their overall health. During your cats routine health exam we will evaluate everything from eye health, to dental health, to cardiac health, to weight management.

Annual Wellness Blood and Urine Screening:

It is important to understand that cats are the most elusive animals when it comes to hiding sickness or health problems. After the age of 9 years they are considered seniors and tracking their internal body health is critical to keeping them healthy through their senior years. The best way to do this is through routine blood and urine screening. It is common knowledge that the most common disease that cats get in their elder years are kidney disease , thyroid disease and cancer. Running routine screening will help us pick up on these disease processes in their early stages so we can best help guide your pets health.

Annual Vaccinations based on needs or exposure:

The Feline Distemper Vaccine is recommended to be given once every 3 years after your cats first year vaccine. Rabies by state law is also required every 3 years.

General Health Recommendations:

Depending on exposure ie. whether of not you have other animals in your household we recommend monthly flea & tick preventions.

All Cats Over 9 years of age: Best Care Standards (Indoor/Outdoor)

Annual Physical Examination:

Cats who are both indoor/outdoor have a greater risk to diseases and parasite exposure. Cats are the most elusive animals when it comes to hiding sickness or health problems and because of that having a through physical exam every year is critical to keeping up their overall health. During your cats routine health exam we will evaluate everything from eye health, to dental health, to cardiac health, to weight management.

Annual Wellness Blood and Urine Screening:

It is important to understand that cats are the most elusive animals when it comes to hiding sickness or health problems. After the age of 9 years they are considered seniors and tracking their internal body health is critical to keeping them healthy through their senior years. The best way to do this is through routine blood and urine screening. It is common knowledge that the most common disease that cats get in their elder years are kidney disease , thyroid disease and cancer. Running routine screening will help us pick up on these disease processes in their early stages so we can best help guide your pets health.

Annual Vaccinations:

It is recommended by the AVMA and Feline Practitioners that all cats who go outside should have the Feline Leukemia Vaccine (FeLV) on an annual basis.

The Feline Distemper Vaccine is recommended to be given once every 3 years after your cats first year vaccine. Rabies by state law is also required every 3 years.

Annual GI Parasite Test (Fecal Testing):

Whether your cat is a passive outdoor explorer or a hunter, having a routine fecal parasite screening is a must. All animals who go outside have an increased exposure to common GI parasites and therefore should be screened for these on an annual basis

General Health Recommendations:

Flea and Tick Prevention:

Currently is only one option for both flea and tick prevention for your cat. That product is Frontline Plus(R) and is safe and effective and should be used if your cat goes outside. The key to making this preventative most effective is by applying this topical medications properly. At MAH we recommend that you shave a small patch of hair down to the skin so that when the liquid is applied, all of it is absorbed by the skin and not taken up by the surrounding hair.

GI Parasite Preventions:

If you use Advantage Multi(R) with your cat, which covers fleas but not ticks, this topical medication also protects your cat against the most common GI parasites.

If you use Frontline Plus(R) which protects against fleas and ticks then your would also want to use a GI parasite preventative. Our staff can help you choose the best options for your cat.